first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By ENS staffPosted Nov 11, 2012 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group November 12, 2012 at 9:30 pm Thank you for referring correctly to the “episcopal ordination” of Father Lambert as called for by the ordinal of the Book of Common Prayer,, rather than using the incorrect and obsolete term “consecration” which few Episcopalians seem to notice has been replaced. May other church communicators be encouraged to do likewise by your good example. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Hoyt Massey says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. William Jay Lambert was elected Nov. 10 as bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Eau Claire, pending the required consents from a majority of bishops with jurisdiction and Standing Committees of the Episcopal Church.Lambert, rector of St. James’ Episcopal Church in Leesburg, Florida (Diocese of Central Florida), was elected on the second ballot out of a field of four nominees. He received 26 votes of 48 cast in the lay order and 18 of 27 cast in the clergy order. An election on that ballot required 25 in the lay order and 14 in the clergy order.The election was held during the diocese’s 84th annual convention at Avalon Hotel and Conference Center in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin.Pending a successful consent process, Lambert will succeed the Rt. Rev. Keith Whitmore, who resigned as Eau Claire’s bishop in 2008 to become assistant bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta. The diocese has been led since September 2010 by Bishop Provisional Edwin Leidel, Jr, former bishop of Eastern Michigan. Eau Claire’s Standing Committee served as the ecclesiastical authority during the period the diocese was without a bishop.Under the canons (III.11.4) of the Episcopal Church, a majority of bishops exercising jurisdiction and diocesan Standing Committees must consent to the bishop-elect’s ordination as bishop within 120 days of receiving notice of the election.As a priest, Lambert has served congregations in Wisconsin and Florida. He also has served on active duty in the U.S. Navy and as a U.S. Navy Reserve Chaplain.Lambert holds a Master of Divinity degree from Nashotah House Seminary in Nashotah, Wisconsin; a Master of Arts degree in history from University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia; and a Bachelor of Arts degree in history and public affairs from Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida.The episcopal ordination is due to take place March 16, 2013, at Christ Church Cathedral in Eau Claire with Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori serving as chief consecrator.The other nominees in the election were:The Rev. Arthur Bailey Hancock, rector, Church of the Ascension, Hayward, Wisconsin (Diocese of Eau Claire);The Rev. Richard Edwin Craig III, supply priest, St. James’ Episcopal Church, West Bend, WI (Diocese of Milwaukee); andThe Reverend Dr. Robert B. Clarke, priest-in-charge, Holy Apostle’s Church, Oneida, Wisconsin (Diocese of Fond Du Lac).Information about all the nominees is available at the Diocese of Eau Claire’s website here.The Diocese of Eau Claire is composed of 2200 members worshiping in 22 congregations throughout Northwestern Wisconsin. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Eau Claire diocese elects William Jay Lambert as bishop AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 House of Bishops, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY (The Rev) John D Grabner says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Elections, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN November 13, 2012 at 11:25 am Dear Jay and May Ruth we are so very proud for the Church and for you! We would love to be in attendance at your ordination. We have many great memories of our days at St.Johns and will keep you both in our prayers as you share your gifts to the greater glory of God and His Church. Yours in Christ,Hoyt + n Glennie New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI November 12, 2012 at 9:34 pm Wow, you may remember I tried to call you here in Ft Myers at St Hilary’s in about 1979 right after you finished at Nashotah, as I was 1963 grad. You had other invites. Bob Biever came and had a good two years but was a devoted artist going out to Washington State. Dabney Smith is now our bishop in SWFL. You are focused and intentional and will give glory to where you are, my brother in Christ, Bob Browning Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Comments are closed. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID robert browning says: Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Comments (3) Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK People Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more


first_img Comments (2) An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rick Cluett says: From clowning to kayaking, hobbies offer clergy respite, re-engagement Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Rev. Bonnie Perry, rector of All Saints, Chicago, kayaking on Lake Michigan.[Episcopal News Service] For the Rev. Bonnie Perry, kayaking the rough waters of Lake Michigan mitigates the stresses of navigating similarly challenging patches of parish life.“It’s insane that we’ve got young people being killed regularly on the streets of Chicago,” the rector of All Saints Church in Chicago said during a recent interview with the Episcopal News Service. “If you’re continually immersed in that kind of sadness and pain, we get beat down.”It renews her spirit to “paddle and bring people to wild places along the coastline of Lake Superior, [and] along Scotland where most people have never gone and it’s awe-inspiring,” she said. “The ocean’s huge, and you can’t ever control it. You have to be in the now, responsive to the environment.”Perry and other Episcopal clergy say their hobbies help them “get a life outside the church” and sometimes bring them right back to it again.Clergy and others need an “on-off switch” between who they are and what they do, according to Elaine Hollensbe, a consultant to CREDO, a Church Pension Group program which for 15 years has offered opportunities for clergy and some lay church employees to examine specific areas of their lives and re-generate their passion and commitment to health and wellness.“You need to carve out a place for yourself where there’s a balance between your own individual unique interests and traits and desires and those of the collective, which in this case would be the priesthood,” said Hollensbe, an associate professor of management at the University of Cincinnati.Some clergy she has interviewed “were fairly good at just saying OK, right now I’m a father, I’m not a priest. But some other priests weren’t able to do that,” she said.“If you don’t, you experience a lot of stress, and don’t have a sense of you other than your work. It’s important that people find a level of balance to find a separate self that rejuvenates, so when they contribute to the collective they have the energy and reserve to do so,” she added.A kayaker since 1995, Perry’s avocation and vocation sometimes merge. At Easter, she said, “Jesus will get up from the dead and … I’ll get on a plane and lead a women’s kayaking retreat in Baja, Mexico.”the Rev. Bonnie Perry, rector of All Saints, Chicago, kayaking at the Falls of Lora, Oban, Argyll, Scotland.She began “really seriously” teaching and coaching others in the sport about seven years ago. She has earned numerous certifications and is one of four women in North America certified as a British Canoe Union 5-Star Leader on the Sea, “which is fairly obscure, but it’s really cool if you understand what I’m talking about,” she said.“Trying to keep eight people in their own craft safe in the midst of 20-knot winds and six-foot waves … flows into what I do in the congregation, trying to figure out how best to lead so people can have the most fun, but you don’t want them crashing into the rocks,” she said. “But you can’t control, you can lead and offer suggestions.”Some people come to All Saints because “of the paddling connection,” she noted.And there are other ways her vocation and avocations merge. “Last year, one of my students died while paddling around Lake Superior. I wasn’t there; he was on a solo trip. So I ended up doing a memorial service for him at one of our symposiums. It’s not a sport without risks, but you try to mitigate them.”‘One-two for the Lord’ – Boxing in HoustonThe Rev. Patrick Miller, rector of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Houston, jokes that he initially started boxing after one too many altar guild meetings.“I would be in these meetings and I would be really mad, and being mad in an altar guild meeting is just wrong,” said Miller, 46, during a recent telephone interview.That former church happened to be located across the street from the Main Boxing Gym in Houston. He wandered over one day and decided to try boxing as a Lenten discipline and for the exercise.Once inside the ring, he discovered the sport “is incredible,” he said. “The workouts are incredible. The people are incredible. I get an incredible amount of wisdom from it. I love my church. I love my church people. But it’s not church, and it’s a completely different environment.”And while it doesn’t exactly heed the gospel call to turn the other cheek, he has “enjoyed finding God in places I don’t expect,” Miller said. He paraphrased another boxer’s mantra ‘de lucha siempra la lucha,’ which roughly translates as: “We are always in the fight, the poor are always in the fight.”“In boxing, there are three-minute rounds with a one-minute rest,” he said. “If you look at that as a metaphor for living, you see there are certain amounts of times in our lives where we have to be in the fight, and there are times when we have to rest, and you have to take advantage of that rest in order to stay in the fight.”He noted other boxing-isms: “My trainer talks about identity. He’ll say, ‘Patrick, I’m having a bad day, but you know what? I’m still Bobby Benton, and I’m going to be OK.’”Miller receives good-natured teasing that his quick combination, a fast flurry of left- and right-handed blows, is “a one-two for the Lord.”Meanwhile, some sparring partners have become parishioners. Some ask for prayers before a fight and during life’s challenges, like divorce and family deaths, Miller said.The experience has given Miller a new perspective about how to handle himself during church meetings. Recently, he said, “in the middle of the conflict, dealing with someone trying to hit you and you trying to hit them,” he heard his trainer’s voice: “Slow down. Breathe. Duck. Move on him. Think about what’s going to happen next.”Boxing reminds him to listen intently during church meetings, he said. “I go to these altar guild meetings now, and I don’t get mad anymore.”Patrolling ski slopes in OhioMost Saturday evenings from December to March, the Rev. Gay Jennings begins an eight-hour shift – not as a priest, but as a volunteer ski patroller on the slopes near her suburban Cleveland home.“People say, ‘You ski in Ohio?’ There are two ski areas about three miles from my house in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, a glacier-created valley, and there are ski areas on either side of the valley,” said Jennings, president of the Episcopal Church’s House of Deputies, during a recent telephone interview. “They’re small. We say it’s better than not skiing.”She bundles up in very warm clothing, boots and patrol jacket, buckles on a patrol pack and steps into ski bindings in preparation for volunteer shifts that may be unpredictable.Sometimes, “it’s like a MASH unit,” she said referring to the mobile army surgical hospitals used for front-line emergencies. Considered first responders, she and her team of about 10 receive extensive off-season first-aid and other training as outdoor emergency-care technicians.“We ski and scan the slopes to make sure it’s safe,” said Jennings. “Injuries can range from somebody coming in the patrol room and asking for a Band-Aid all the way to a serious head injury or a broken femur, which require getting the person off the hill quickly and safely so that the next level of emergency care can transport them to a hospital,” she said.When she began volunteering 23 years ago Jennings, 62, was canon to the ordinary in the Diocese of Ohio. Her life seemed as though “everything was church.”On the patrol, she’s served with the same “eclectic” team – an architect, a mechanic, an engineer, college students, a community organizer – for about 15 years.“Some of us go to church, and some of us wouldn’t go near a church,” she said. “We watch out for each other on and off the slopes. We eat dinner together; we do potluck. It’s kind of like church.”Her involvement has led to requests that she officiate at funerals and weddings of other ski patrollers over the years, and she believes being part of the group has made her a better priest, Jennings said.It has “provided recreation, fellowship, friends, a balance in my life. It’s forced me to exercise, even though sometimes it’s awfully cold,” she said. “It’s made me a better priest in the sense that it gets me out of church. Obviously, that is the main focus of my vocation and ministry, but I think you can have too much of a good thing. So, for me, the ski patrol provides balance and a lot of fun.”Woodworking in San DiegoHandcrafting, planing, sawing, sanding, assembling and finishing furniture has been an avocation for San Diego Bishop Jim Mathes for 30 years.Over time, he has built shelves, desks and coffee tables to furnish the homes of friends and families; about half the time he works from plans purchased on the Internet. “The other half I design,” he said via e-mail.Recently, he created a 52-bottle mahogany wine rack to auction during a fundraiser to benefit Episcopal Community Services, a diocesan agency providing social services to low-income families and individuals. The sale earned $1,000.“I chose … mahogany because it is a wood that I like to work with,” Mathes said. “It looks beautiful with semi-gloss varnish.”Woodworking allows him “time when I create something tangible,” he said. “I take my mind totally off of the church – if I didn’t, I wouldn’t have all my fingers!”‘North Carolina: A theology of foolishness’The Rev. Joseph Hensley Jr., as Ashes, the clown.The Rev. Joseph Hensley Jr. says clowning, and more specifically his clown character Ashes, are part of a theology of foolishness that “shake things up and helps others look at the world differently.”He has performed as Ashes – with oversized black pants and rainbow suspenders, big red nose, red cheeks, crazy hats, haphazardly fastened tie and white shirt, black Converse All-Star shoes and sometimes an accordion – in venues as varied as St. Luke’s Church in Durham, retirement communities and in the middle of the Miami Airport while returning from a church mission trip to Belize.“It’s about being able to take this crazy character into places where there might be a need to spread some joy,” said Hensley, assistant to St. Luke’s rector, during a recent interview with ENS.The name Ashes comes from the children’s nursery rhyme, “Ring Around the Rosie,” said Hensley, who will lead a workshop during the June 10-14 Kanuga Conference Center’s Christian Formation Conference in Hendersonville.“As church leaders, we are expected to look impressive,” said Hensley, 39. “In some ways I think there’s this expectation that we give ourselves and that other people put on us, that we have to behave in certain ways and do certain things. In ministry, what I’ve tried to do is turn that upside down.”Like in the nursery rhyme, which ends with “we all fall down,” the spirit of clowning “helps give us a sense of courage to be willing to fail – but to fail with grace and with humility, and, to me, that’s a big part of the life of faith.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is an Episcopal News Service correspondent. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET April 18, 2013 at 8:40 pm A great column, full of good news and a Gospel truth. These folks are right. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Jonathan Frazier says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ April 18, 2013 at 10:45 pm The shooting sports – or any activity that requires singular focus – can also be wonderful for stress relief . By Pat McCaughanPosted Apr 18, 2013 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY last_img read more


first_imgAbsalom Jones’ vibrancy lives on at St. Thomas, Philadelphia Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Black History Month, By Pat McCaughanPosted Feb 13, 2014 In conjunction with Black History Month, the Episcopal News Service will publish feature articles on several historically black Episcopal congregations during February.The congregation of the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas, Philadelphia, during the Palm Sunday procession in March 2013.[Episcopal News Service] Feb. 13 may be the church calendar’s official recognition of the life and ministry of the Rev. Absalom Jones, but for Mary Sewell Smith and others at the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas in Philadelphia, every day is founder’s day.Jones – the Episcopal Church’s and the nation’s first black priest – founded St. Thomas in 1792 as the country’s first historically black church of any denomination, and “that spirit that permeated the early church has come down through the years and is still alive and well and thriving,” Smith said.“A guiding force in our church is the life and legacy of Rev. Jones. It is just part of my life,” said Smith, a lifelong parishioner and current member of the church’s historical society. “We try to live up to the principles he espoused: freedom, liberty, education, worship, community service.”Besides St. Thomas, 90-some historically black Episcopal churches remain today, congregations created by blacks not welcomed in mainline Episcopal churches post-slavery and during racial segregation throughout the United States, according to the Rev. Harold T. Lewis, a former staff officer for black ministries at the Episcopal Church Center in New York and the author of “Yet With a Steady Beat: the African American Struggle for Recognition in the Episcopal Church” (Trinity Press International, 1996).The oldest, St. Thomas, grew out of the Free African Society, an independent mutual-aid organization created by Absalom Jones and Richard Allen to provide assistance for the economic, educational, social and spiritual needs of the African-American community. Those efforts continued in the church.“Most black congregations have always been about uplift, social action, outreach and empowering the community,” Lewis said.“What is unfortunate is that many people in the church, black and white, are unaware of that history and don’t know how many people have fought to get us where we are today,” he added, citing the Episcopal Church’s checkered past with regard to African Americans and racism.Portrait of Absalom Jones rendered by Philadelphia artist Raphaelle Peale in 1810.Infused by the spirit of Absalom JonesOne of Smith’s earliest memories is of gazing up at the iconic portrait of Jones painted by Raphaelle Peale in 1810 and hanging in the church narthex as her father told her the story of St. Thomas’ founder, who was born into slavery, taught himself to read and purchased his freedom in 1784. Six years earlier, he had purchased his wife Mary’s freedom.Jones served as a lay minister until he and other blacks were asked to leave St. George’s Methodist Episcopal Church in Philadelphia. That exodus prompted Richard Allen and Jones to create the Free African Society. It led to Allen founding the African Methodist Episcopal Church and to Jones’ ordination in the Episcopal Church as a deacon and, nine years later, at age 58, a priest.But then-Pennsylvania Bishop William White would agree to ordain Jones and receive St. Thomas into the diocese only if the church did not send any clergy or deputies to diocesan convention, thus depriving blacks of voice or vote in church governance, which “characterized the duality of race relations within the church for much of its history,” according to historical documents of the church.Smith recalled visits to Jones’ grave, located “in the same cemetery where our family graves are. And when we would go to visit our family, we would always say a prayer at Rev. Jones’ marker.” Jones’ remains have been exhumed since then and cremated and placed in an urn at a commemorative chapel inside the Gothic-style church, she said.Smith grew up playing on the church steps, along with childhood friends Mercedes Sadler and sisters Lucille and Isabel Hamill. The 70- and 80-something women continue to share a love of church and history as members of the historical society. They say the church infused them with a sense of belonging. Its story is their story, and also the nation’s story.History lives: ‘Very much a part of church’One of the greatest joys for retired schoolteachers and sisters Isabel Hamill, 87, and Lucille Hamill, 83, was finding a mention of their aunt, Bertha Jones, included among the names of church women supporting various war efforts.“There were notes about the women who helped roll bandages for the Spanish-American War,” said Lucille Hamill. “And the women held canteens during World War I and World War II, where the young men could come and eat and be mothered by the older women in the church, and they used to come.”For the Hamills, finding words for all that the church has meant to them is difficult. “It made you feel included, in a city where there was still rampant segregation when we were young,” Lucille Hamill said. “It just made you feel a part of something bigger than yourself, and that was important.”To preserve the congregation’s history, the church had created an archive in an adjoining building but encountered climate and moisture issues that are being resolved, Smith said. The church’s archives offer a window into a past filled with social activism and community outreach, and even a glimpse of future possibilities.“I think because we know quite a bit about what the church has been like down through the years, it leads us, it infuses the present,” Smith said.Included in the archives are Jones’ baptismal records from the late 1700s, birth and death records, sermons and speeches, membership rolls and vestry meeting minutes.Some documents, in the process of being restored, predate the church. “We actually have a volume of accounts from the Free African Society,” Smith said. “Everything that I ever read says that no records of this organization had survived, but, in going through our old records, we have come across this volume, from 1790 until 1792, when the society disbanded and transitioned into the church.“Each member had a page, and it shows they paid a couple of shillings, and this was money used to serve the poor and the disabled. You can see how people paid their dues and how they would miss a couple of months and then catch it up.”Looking back, the focus was “always on community service,” she said. “The St. Mary’s Guild in the 1800s made clothing for children who couldn’t afford clothes to go to school. The Sons of St. Thomas – we have the minutes of these organizations – fashioned themselves after the Free African Society and functioned very much the same way.”The Dorcas Society was composed of women, “and their primary function seems to have been to arrange and pay for burials of women in the church or community,” she said.Church membership rolls read like a who’s who in African-American society, said Mercedes Sadler, 77, a sixth-generation Episcopalian and a member of the chancel choir, one of five church choirs.They include James Forten, born in 1766 to free black parents. He fought in the Revolutionary War and parlayed an apprenticeship at a sail-making company into a wealthy business venture. He used more than half his wealth to purchase freedom for slaves, to help finance William Lloyd Garrison’s abolitionist newspaper, The Liberator, to operate an Underground Railroad station out of his home and to fund a school for black children.Octavius Valentine Catto was “a Renaissance man and a St. Thomas vestry member back in the day,” Sadler said. “He was shot and killed while trying to get people to go out and vote.”Catto was about 5 when his family moved to Philadelphia from South Carolina in 1850. A social activist, he was also an accomplished baseball shortstop and player-coach and the founder and captain of the Pythian Baseball Club. A Republican and supporter of Abraham Lincoln, he worked for passage of the 15th Amendment, allowing black men the right to vote, but was killed on Oct. 10, 1871, Election Day. One of his baseball bats is among the archive memorabilia.St. Thomas’ clergy and parishioners played key roles in the abolition/anti-slavery/Underground Railroad movements and the early equal rights movement of the 1800s, according to the website. “Over the past 50 years, St. Thomas has figured prominently in the civil rights movement, the NAACP, Union of Black Episcopalians, Opportunities Industrialization Center, Philadelphia Interfaith Action and the Episcopal Church Women.”For Smith, the memories are personal and precious. She recalled watching her brother practicing altar duties and the art of candle-lighting at home. Although girls were not allowed to serve as acolytes then, she discovered other ways to serve, as did her mother.“My mother was what you call an acolyte mother,” Smith said. “In those days, you never knew which acolytes would show up. So, if a short one showed up, she had to pluck up the cassocks and put pins in them. I used to be in the sacristy with her before the service, getting them ready. In those days they didn’t have girls as acolytes, but I always found things to do.”Looking back, moving forwardBesides community involvement, St. Thomas has remained committed “to uphold the knowledge and value of the black presence in the Episcopal Church,” according to the website. The church is offering a Black History Month exhibit, conducts regular tours for visitors and continues to preserve its wealth of records and to develop its archives.“It’s such a blessing that we have these wonderful records,” Smith said. “Somehow, it was recognized, down through the years, that these records were valuable. You really get a sense of what life was like, the people, who were the movers and shakers. It has connected me and expanded my knowledge of black history and connection to the black community in a way I didn’t have.”Although the church has moved four times since Absalom Jones founded it, it continues to grow and welcome others “with a little bit of something for everyone,” Sadler says. Its members represent the range of the African diaspora as well as “a fair number” of whites.Stained-glass windows installed in 2000 pay homage not only to Jones but also to several black giants of the faith: Archbishop Desmond Tutu; retired Massachusetts Suffragan Bishop Barbara Harris, the first woman elected a bishop in the Episcopal Church; and Bishop Suffragan Franklin Turner, who bequeathed a crosier to the archives.Turner, who retired in 2000, died Dec. 31, 2013, and a requiem was held Jan. 11.At a 1992 service at St. Thomas to rebury the remains of Absalom Jones, Franklin had said of black Episcopalians, “We have indeed come this far by faith.”“We can be justly proud of our sojourn in the Episcopal Church, although it has been an uphill struggle,” he said.Uplift, empower, welcomeIn the spirit of Absalom Jones’ push for education, the church is launching an after-school program, said the Rev. Angelo Wildgoose, associate rector.“The after-school program is geared toward schools in our area and is basically looking towards helping with homework, technology, computer sciences, with SAT tips; and the church is involved in a variety of outreach efforts,” he told ENS.Among other church programs, the five choirs offer a range of music: classical, spirituals, gospel, jazz.A new middle school and high school “Souldiers for Christ” class is set to begin Feb. 16, said Wildgoose, who has served at the church since December. Another program, designed to connect students with local Episcopal churches during their college years, re-launched in December with about 15 students, he said.“The idea is to give them that home away from home where they’ll be able to continue to worship at an Episcopal church and at the same time to have some familiar surroundings,” he said. “We’re trying to make sure we keep our young people engaged, from the children up to those in college. We’re stressing a lot of parental involvement.”Average Sunday attendance is about 400 at one service, with about 50 children in the church school. “There’s a little bit of something for everyone here,” Sadler said.For Smith, her lifelong friends and many others, St. Thomas has been a spiritual and a palpable home, “an anchor, somewhere to organize their life around, and with people of like interests,” Smith said. “We’re fortunate that our congregation is multi-generational, with a wonderful church school, a great group of teens and all the ‘Souldiers for Christ,’ and that each age group can feel ownership in the church and become an active part of the life of the church.“It has certainly added to my life, and I think that’s what people find when they come here, and that’s why every Sunday we have people joining the church.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is an Episcopal News Service correspondent. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ethnic Ministries New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more


first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Apr 11, 2014 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Tags Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Video Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Reclaiming the Gospel of Peace 2014, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Video: Heidi Shott on rural poverty and restorative justice in Maine Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Gun Violence, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Submit a Press Release [Episcopal News Service – Oklahoma City, Oklahoma] Heidi Shott, canon for communications in the Diocese of Maine, talks about generational poverty, the high prevalence of domestic violence in her state and the diocese’s taking on restorative justice work. Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PAlast_img read more


first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Haiti, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rev. Barbara Smith-Moran says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Alla Bozarth says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ December 20, 2014 at 11:07 am It is humbling to observe, again and again, how little it takes to please people who possess little, in terms of our ‘worldly goods’. It is also good to see that there are already well established and well accepted WOMEN BISHOPS outside the ‘Anglican Mother Church’ in England.I can’t help wondering though that if a Churchwoman in a huge hat and some Churchmen in fancy dresses and completely unsuitable hats can have so much meaning for some people, how much more would they be able to achieve- Spiritually and emotionally- if they were to dress like their King who couldn’t afford to change his ‘one-piece’ apparel even for the Last Supper, leave alone having a wardrobe full of Fancy Dresses ? Sounds cynical, I know, but there is nothing to lose by giving it a go, surely ? Any takers amongst our Lord and Lady Bishos ? May you all know and feel the presence of our feckless King during this wonderful Season of Christmas and have courage to follow that feckless King into life’s mysteries, in the Coming Year. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI December 23, 2014 at 10:45 am Might be helpful to those unfamiliar with Haitian geography to include a map of the places visited.I have been there (St. Paul’s Church and School in Petit Trou de Nippes) so I am familiar, but most people don’t even know where it is other than vaguely on the Caribbean somewhere….or that it shares the island with the Dominican Republic. James Michie says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release January 11, 2015 at 6:27 pm Laudable, Katharine, that you would visit troubled Haiti. I am sure that all Haitains very much appreciated your concern. Can you tell us when you intend to visit Gaza in Palestine, where more than 2,100 Palestinians, 546 of them children (1,500 children were orphaned), and thousands more were wounded in the 51-day bombardment of Gaza this past July and August? As I am sure you have read, more than 110,000 Gazans lost their homes in the destruction and hospitals, schools, mosques, businesses and Gaza’s only power plant were either destroyed or heavily damaged. The 1.7 million Palestinians in Gaza continue to suffer from serious shortages of fuel, medicines, medical supplies, food, potable water and electricity. There is no postal service in Gaza for receiving and distribution of care packages. The eight-year siege/blockade of Gaza continues, with the vast majority of the population imprisoned behind barbed wire and walls at its closed borders with Israel and Egypt. As a parishioner at the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer in Bethesda, Maryland, I would hope that you would join Archbishop Suheil Dawani for a visit to war-devastated Gaza to comfort the suffering population in that venue.Sincerely,Jim Michie Janet King says: Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA December 18, 2014 at 5:23 pm This is a wonderful story and an important witness by our Presiding Bishop. She preached with her usual clear-sighted honesty about the difficult situations she encountered and the gospel’s response. It is hopeful to know that Bp. Duracin and Bp. Beauvoir are able to use their considerable influence to change the political landscape in Haiti for the sake of the Kingdom. God bless Haiti and the long-suffering Haitian people. “Kè poze sou latè pou tout.” New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN center_img Acharya Nihal says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Haiti Bishop Jean Zaché Duracin, right, Haiti Bishop Suffragan Ogé Beauvoir, left, and clergy pose on the steps of Holy Spirit Parish in Cap-Haitien following the Dec. 14 Eucharist. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Cap-Haitien, Haiti] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori recently became the first ever primate to visit northern Haiti.“It is a very significant visit for us,” said the Rt. Rev. Ogé Beauvoir, bishop suffragan of the Diocese of Haiti, during a Dec. 15 interview with Episcopal News Service at the diocesan office in Pétionville, a suburb of Port-au-Prince.Each Sunday Episcopalians in northern Haiti pray for the presiding bishop, said Beauvoir, who has lived in Cap-Haitien since becoming suffragan bishop in 2012, but with the exception of very few, they’ve never met her. As worshipers were boarding buses following the Dec. 14 Eucharist, they told Beauvoir, “’please express our thanks and love to our presiding bishop, tell her that we love her,’” he said.The presiding bishop visited Haiti Dec. 13-15, stopping first in the north where she preached at Holy Spirit Parish, visited the parish’s school and the nearby Holy Spirit trade school. It was her sixth trip to Haiti, the first being in 2008 before the devastating Jan. 12, 2010, earthquake that killed thousands of people and leveled Port-au-Prince, including the diocese’s Trinity Cathedral and its complex.  Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori tours Holy Spirit School in Cap-Haitien. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSJefferts Schori was accompanied by Alexander Baumgarten, director of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s Department of Public Engagement and Mission Communication, on the trip that began three days earlier with a visit to the Diocese of the Dominican Republic, where they learned about the government’s efforts to strip citizenship from Dominicans of Haitian descent.“We’ve been in the Dominican Republic the last few days to learn more about the need for good news in the face of what the courts there have said about people of Haitian descent who live there,” said the presiding bishop during her Dec. 14 sermon. “The legal decisions seem to say that even if you were born there, if your parents or grandparents came from Haiti to work there, you have no right to have your birth recorded or your citizenship guaranteed. Many people have been caught between the two nations, effectively unclaimed by either one. Those without a recognized status cannot work, go to school, travel out of the country, or gain recognition for their own children.”“The roots of this injustice are many – racism, colonial history, a lust for power, even official incompetence and neglect. They are the same sinful realities that have confronted human beings from the beginning – we don’t always choose to love our neighbors as ourselves.“The good news is that all of us are claimed by the nation called the Reign of God. Together, we can decide to use our voices and actions to change the world’s bad news… ,” she said.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori speaks with a parishioner following the Dec. 14 Eucharist at Holy Spirit Parish in Cap-Haitien. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThe presiding bishop’s trip to Haiti came at a time of violent protests against the government of President Michel Martelly. Protesters are demanding long-delayed legislative and local elections. On Nov. 28, Martelly appointed an 11-member commission of former officials and religious leaders, including Beauvoir, to help resolve the political stalemate that has since 2011 stalled the elections.The commission recommended that Haitian Prime Minister Laurent Lamothe resign, which he did on Dec. 14.“It is part of our ministry,” said Beauvoir of his appointment to the commission. “When the country is in trouble and the government asks us for help, it is our task to bring the people together.“Being an Episcopalian means being tolerant, and there is a lack of tolerance in society today and that’s what we bring to the table.”Martelly has accepted the recommendation of the commission and is willing to act on it, and the prime minister has just resigned, said Beauvoir Dec. 15.“Those are signs of hope, and the next step is to call on the opposition to come and talk,” he said.Violent protests continued on Dec. 16 when demonstrators took to the streets of the capital demanding the president’s resignation.Unless elections are held before Jan. 12, 2015, the fifth anniversary of the earthquake, Haiti will be left without a functioning parliament until its late 2015 presidential elections.“We have always had political instability but have seen some progress,” said Diocese of Haiti Bishop Jean Zaché Duracin. “The situation is not as it was when the earthquake happened, but we could do more for the Haitian people. Many young people feel they have been abandoned [by the government] regarding education, health care, the financial situation is not good, unemployment is high. I think we have a lot to do.”The Episcopal Church is well respected in Haiti and has played a large role in the country’s post-earthquake redevelopment; however, the country remains the poorest in the western hemisphere.   Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Haiti Bishop Jean Zaché Duracin and the Rev. Jean MacDonald, retired, during a visit to the trade school in Cap-Haitien. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSHaiti has an 80 percent unemployment rate and millions of people live in extreme poverty; following the earthquake Haitians from throughout the country flocked to the devastated Port-au-Prince to receive international aid. Eventually, NGOs and donors realized they needed to invest in rural and urban development outside the capital to encourage Haitians to return home. That work can be seen both at St. Barnabas Center for Agriculture, where the diocese is training 54 students in agriculture, and at the trade school where it offers courses in mechanics, plumbing and electricity.The diocese has a partnership with the Florida-based Food for the Poor in the northern region through which it is helping young people get life skills, said Beauvoir, pointing to the 420 students studying at the trade school.“With the partnership with Food for the Poor, we pay for 250 of them,” he said. “We are trying to empower young folks. Also we are working with the people in the villages on organizing their lives together… and with women on social justice issues.”The Diocese of Haiti is the largest diocese of the Episcopal Church and covers the entire 10.7 thousand square mile country; 46 clergy serve more than 200 churches, 254 schools, two hospitals and 13 clinics.The diocese plans to introduce a resolution at the 2015 General Convention in Salt Lake City, Utah, that if passed would establish a second diocese in the north.Establishing a second diocese in Haiti would allow the leadership to hone and intensify the growth underway in that region by providing more local attention and support, and the ability to respond to opportunities and challenges more quickly, Jefferts Schori told ENS after the visit.“For example, the Northern Region Assembly held just before we arrived is an example of a proto-diocesan leadership council that can strategize for that part of the diocese,” she said. “Sustainability comes from the ability to match missional resources with missional needs, and it always has to be context-specific.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Lynette Wilson Posted Dec 18, 2014 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Comments (6) Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Presiding Bishop makes historic visit to northern Haiti Jefferts Schori preaches on the Third Sunday of Advent An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel December 19, 2014 at 10:11 am As an Colorado Episcopal nurse practioner, I have worked in northeast Haiti now for 6 medical missions trips. I have worked in the town of Ouanaminthe since the quake. Have always wondered why there was not Episcopal presence there when the town is only 45 mninutes away from Cap Haiten. This article explains more to me and I am praying for an expansion of mission work into Ouanaminthe as there is so much need for children’s homes, housing in general and medical needs. Who is the contact from the USA side for Cap Haiten mission work? Please call me. 505-860-7557 Thanks for the information. Bon De Bon! Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments are closed. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AliceMarie Slaven-Emond,RN,MS, FNP-C says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA December 19, 2014 at 1:55 am Amen to all that the Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori prophetically and straightforwardly said and the Rev. Barbara Smith-Moran so eloquently wrote. Thank you for this helpful article, Lynette Wilson and ENS! Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more


first_img Comments are closed. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York John Horne says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME March 11, 2016 at 9:20 pm So when will you welcome same-sex couple into the Church, in this Diocese? Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This artist rendering shows the planned pool area of the new Program Center at DaySpring Episcopal Center, the Diocese of Southwest Florida’s camp and conference center. Photo: Diocese of Southwest Florida[Diocese of Southwest Florida] The Diocese of Southwest Florida is expanding its DaySpring Episcopal Center, with new programs, a new 10-year master plan and a $3.6 million program center and pool complex. The investment in the 97-acre camp is the largest ever for the retreat and conference center located along the Manatee River south of Tampa Bay.“DaySpring exists to form disciples for Jesus Christ,” said Bishop Dabney Tyler Smith during the groundbreaking for the new facilities, which begin construction next week. “It exists to form disciples who are already ordained, it exists to form disciples who are seeking a new relationship with Christ, it exists to form disciples for those who have lost their way and have decided to come home. The program at DaySpring exists for the formation of God’s people.”DaySpring has taken an increasingly important role in the Episcopal Church in Florida since it opened in 1983. In addition to the usual offerings of a camp and conference center, it also houses the office of the Bishop. When the Diocese of South Florida divided in 1969, Southwest Florida was without its own conference facility. In 1979, Southwest Florida acquired a 76-acre tract along the Manatee River, now called DaySpring. The parcel, packed with live oaks and Spanish moss, was within one hour of much of the diocese, and easily accessible off of what was to be a newly expanded Interstate 75.Immediately, Episcopal groups came, and in successive years, new cottages and residences were acquired. Amenities like nature trails and ropes courses were added and a wood-framed carpenter gothic chapel was relocated there to serve as the centerpiece of the campus. When Smith arrived in 2007, DaySpring was struggling financially, in spite of its popularity. Smith was immediately committed to the center, promoting its value and potential to diocesan leadership.The idea is to see DaySpring as the “spiritual nerve center” of diocesan life, so that the audience and impact of formation and congregational development programming there grows, even beyond the diocesan boundaries.The Rev. Michael Durning, canon to the ordinary, and Bishop Dabney Smith participate in the groundbreaking for a new program center at DaySpring Episcopal Center. Photo: Diocese of Southwest Florida“Bishop Smith’s clear vision for the diocese as we approach our 50th anniversary is the guide for what we are doing,” said Anne M. Vickers, chief financial officer and Canon for administration and finance at the diocese. “Our diocesan staff, which includes all of the staff at DaySpring, are committed to implementing this vision.”Vickers credits Executive Director Carla Odell and the DaySpring staff with their skill in managing a sustainable conference center budget, carefully managing expenses to the varying revenue throughout the season.“This project is the tangible sign of the vision and operations coming together,” said Vickers.Visits to DaySpring grew in 2012, when the Diocese of Southwest Florida moved its offices to DaySpring, making it easier for diocesan staff to hold smaller and more frequent meetings, giving more visibility to the center amongst Episcopalians. Immediately, the operations of the diocese became connected to the camp, which not only offers programs and training for the 77 congregations of the diocese, but serves tens of thousands of locals, as well as visitors from outside of Florida. The camp’s budget today has grown to around $1.5 million; DaySpring now benefits from a maintenance endowment established under Smith’s leadership that has grown from to $726,000 in six years.The brightening financial picture included becoming an attractive retreat center for guests, who come for the peace and quiet. DaySpring serves groups that range from University of South Florida to football camps to retiree craft and quilting gatherings. Last year the 304-bed facility served 62,799 meals. Just this winter, DaySpring has hosted the national meeting of the Episcopal Camps and Conference Centers and the national board of Episcopal Church Women.On March 1 the diocese began a new era at DaySpring as they broke ground on a new facility, with dignitaries and almost 100 priests from across Southwest Florida on retreat at DaySpring’s annual College of Presbyters conference. Early that day, the priests had heard Brother Randy Greve of New York’s Holy Cross Monastery speak on the modern interest in monastic life.The new 12,500-square-foot Program Center, set to open by December, will serve as DaySpring’s primary area for youth and adult programs, art and music recreation activities, retreats, teaching and worship. Two key amenities include a 5,000-square-foot multi-use recreation/meeting hall and a 2,000-square-foot pool alongside an outdoor pavilion. The new program center replaces an aging portable building and represents the first of a multiphase, 10-year DaySpring master development plan initiated in 2014. The $20 million master plan calls for two additional phases, which will include construction of a new and larger worship center and more hotel-like residential facilities.A majority of the riverfront property, much of it wetlands, will remain undeveloped, even as residential and commercial development in the area increases. In 2015, the diocese added two properties to DaySpring, including a 2.5 acre wooded area to keep the perimeter of DaySpring untouched.In his address at the groundbreaking, Smith referred to Bishop Paul Haynes, the second bishop of the Diocese, under whose leadership DaySpring was established. Citing the “beauty of this place,” Smith reminded that nature is but a part of the experience. “What we do here is to retain and preserve the beauty, and make programmatic space for the formation of God’s people,” said Smith. “Both, you see, are required.” Featured Events Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC March 23, 2016 at 1:13 pm I agree. I would also like to know when LGBT people will be allowed to fully participate in the Diocese of Southwest Florida. Separate but equal has never worked. This Diocese should step up to its responsibility to the Episcopal Church and its canons and direction. I hope for this day. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Steven Colburn says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Southwest Florida seeks larger church role for Episcopal Center Multi-million expansion starts new status for DaySpring New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments (2) Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing By Garland PollardPosted Mar 11, 2016 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more


first_img Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Brotherhood of St Andrew names Joe McDaniel Jr. to new racial reconciliation post Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Brotherhood of St. Andrew] Floridian Joe McDaniel Jr. has been appointed national vice president of  the Brotherhood of St Andrew’s newly created Committee on Racial Reconciliation.He is tasked with creating a strategy to expose the 5,000-member men’s ministry to the Episcopal Church’s Ministry of Racial Reconciliation.A former corporate finance attorney in New York City, McDaniel was a deputy to General Convention in 2018. He also served as the legislative assistant to the House of Deputies Committee for the Confirmation of the Presiding Bishop at the 2015 General Convention.He is a trained facilitator in conducting racial reconciliation workshops in the Episcopal Diocese of The Central Gulf Coast, where he also serves on its Commission on Ministry and its Cursillo Commission. He has been a delegate at numerous diocesan conventions and has served as senior warden for Christ Church Episcopal Parish and on a various number of its committees and sub-committees.“We are very excited about the ability to make a statement about expanding the men’s ministry movement into this vital area, which is a priority for The Episcopal Church,” Brotherhood President Jeffrey Butcher said making the announcement July 21 in Louisville during the Brotherhood’s annual national council meeting.“We need men to address the issue of racism within the wider church and within our own organization.“The creation of this Committee on Racial Reconciliation is a statement that tells the church and our members we are very serious concerning the challenges that racism presents us in bringing men and youth closer to Christ,” President Butcher said. “We are stepping up to the plate to address this serious issue.”McDaniel quoted Matthew 15:21-28, where it states: “Yea. Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters’ tables.” This story in Matthew’s Gospel details Jesus’ encounter with a Canaanite woman. Her nationality makes her an outsider and on this basis even Jesus rejects her when she comes seeking help for her daughter. But the Canaanite woman challenges Jesus on his refusal and Jesus praises her faith and heals her daughter after all.This story demonstrates that God’s love is so expansive, it can surprise and stretch even Jesus Christ himself. It encourages Christians to be mindful of our own prejudices and understand that God’s love isn’t as restrictive as our own.It is in this spirit of the furtherance of justice, that the Brotherhood of St. Andrew has created the Committee on Racial Reconciliation where we will conduct an examination of our own unconscious and in some cases conscious prejudices. The work will sometimes be painful for some but it will be enlightening and hopefully rewarding as we seek to bridge an understanding between the races that led to the killings in Charleston at the AME Church of nine African American parishioners as they welcomed Dylann Roof to join them in a Bible study.Roof is a self-confessed white supremacist whose goal was to create a race war. Yet in a move that stunned many observers, many of the family members of those who were murdered expressed their forgiveness to him for the unbelievable carnage which he had unleashed upon them and their family members.It is this sense of reconciliation for the past sins of racism that we must achieve if we are to move forward reconciled to one another in a sense of love and unity, and to do so we must acknowledge the sins of the past. We must engage in active dialogue to discuss it, no matter how uncomfortable such a discussion may be.As Archbishop Desmond Tutu said, “Our common experience in fact is the opposite – that the past, far from disappearing or lying down and being quiet, has an embarrassing and persistent way of returning and haunting us unless it has in fact been dealt with adequately.“Unless we look the beast in the eye we find it has an uncanny habit of returning to hold us hostage.”To confront the beast, our goal is to conduct a series of workshops across the nation and invite all the Brotherhood of St. Andrew chapters in the applicable dioceses to attend these one-day workshops, where they will be exposed to the national curriculum developed by The Episcopal Church on Racial Reconciliation. The goal of such training is to expose and uncover the unconscious biases, in a non-threatening way, which we all harbor towards one another, with the purpose of learning who we are and why we think the way we do.The goal is for The Brotherhood to be on the forefront of the Jesus Movement in its Ministry of Racial Reconciliation as we seek the furtherance of the beloved community.— Jim Goodson is editor of the St. Andrew’s Cross, the publication of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew. People Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC By Jim GoodsonPosted Aug 8, 2017 Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more


first_img Submit a Press Release Tags Good Book Club among diverse Lenten tools offered by the Episcopal Church Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events By Amy SowderPosted Feb 5, 2018 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Holy Week/Easter, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ A worshiper receives ashes at St. Bart’s in New York City. Photo: Episcopal Church submission[Episcopal News Service] Instead of seeing this Lenten season as a time to do without, you can approach it from a more plentiful perspective: an opportunity to grow closer to Jesus, with more resources than ever.That’s how Presiding Bishop Michael Curry sees it. Lent can be a chance to deepen your intimacy with Christ, he said in a video about helpful Lenten tools, including the Good Book Club.Lent begins on Ash Wednesday, which falls on Feb. 14 this year – coinciding with Valentine’s Day – and it lasts through Thursday, March 29, when the Triduum of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday begins.Typically, Lent involves fasting and abstinence of some sort, inspired by the 40 days and nights Jesus fasted in the wilderness, according to several Bible passages, including Luke 4:1-13. Christians are invited “to the observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance; by prayer, fasting, and self-denial; and by reading and meditating on God’s holy Word,” according to page 265 of the Book of Common Prayer.There are more ways than ever to accomplish these aspirations.For the first time, Forward Movement presents the Good Book Club to the Episcopal Church and other interested people as a comprehensive resource to observe Lent. The program is a partnership with more than 25 organizations in the church, Richelle Thompson told Episcopal News Service. She’s the Forward Movement deputy director and managing editor.“One of the reasons we tried to build this is because in one way, it’s a choose-your-own-adventure; we have resources from so many different organizations,” Thompson said. “We really tried to add a lot of variety so people can find what best suits their needs, and so they can find it the way God is calling them to engage in scripture.”The Good Book Club begins Feb. 11, the Sunday before Ash Wednesday, and continues through Pentecost, May 20. Forward Movement has created a set of daily readings to divide Luke and Acts into 50 days each. Each day, participants will read a few verses of Luke through the end of March and then Acts beginning on Easter Sunday and running through May 20.The club features everything from a podcast from Episcopal Migration Ministries to a downloadable booklet to encourage a spirit of gratitude created by United Thank Offering. Parents will find tools to engage their children. A Good Book Club app for iPhones and Android phones has daily readings, a coloring page and a journal for those on the go.There’s a good reason to study Luke and Acts together.“Scholars tell us that the gospel of Luke and the book of Acts are part 1 and part 2 of the same story, probably by the same author,” Curry said in his video on the Good Book Club.Luke tells about Jesus while he lived among us, and Acts describes what his followers did afterward, as they put his teachings into action, Curry said.“Reading scripture individually and collectively can change our spiritual life,” Thompson said. She laughed. “And only God knows how we will be all changed by the end of this.”Other resources:“Set Free by Truth” – Curry has joined the leaders of the Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America to offer a series of Lenten devotions. They begin with Ash Wednesday, Feb. 14, and continue for each of the Sundays in Lent, along with Palm Sunday and the Triduum. Each segment of “Set Free by Truth” presents scripture citations, a reflection and a prayer. They are available in three formats here. Episcopal Relief & Development Sunday – Falling on Feb. 18 this year, this churchwide tradition is marked with special prayers, materials and a dedicated offering to support the organization’s worldwide programs. Special resources and a planning guide for Episcopal Relief & Development Sunday are available at on the organization’s Sunday page. Churches can download copies Episcopal Relief & Development’s 2018 Lenten Meditations booklets in English and Spanish by visiting the organization’s Lent page here. Lent Madness – The Rev. Tim Schenck created this ministry in 2010 to combine his love of sports with his passion for the lives of saints. It’s a fun way for people to learn about the Episcopal Church’s Calendar of Saints. The program starts with 32 saints placed into a tournament-like, single-elimination bracket. At the championship, the winner is awarded the coveted Golden Halo. The first round consists of basic biographical information about each of the 32 saints. Subsequent rounds include quotes, quirks, legends and more saintly kitsch. Learn more at Lent Madness here. Art Stations of the Cross – Feb. 14-April 1, visit the 14 stations for reflection, worship services and discussions in New York. Learn more at Art Stations here.Meeting Jesus in the Gospel of John – A six-week study of the gospel of John starting Feb. 11 is available, including a downloadable journal and facilitation guidance for groups. Learn more from the Society of Saint John the Evangelist here.Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service and a freelance writer and editor based in Brooklyn. She can be reached at [email protected] Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Lent Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more


first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Mar 24, 2020 Submit a Job Listing [Anglican Communion] As governments around the world react and respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, many people are finding themselves facing unprecedented restrictions on their day-to-day lives.Many of us will have lived with such restrictions on a temporary basis in our particular country or region over recent years in response to instability, wars, and natural disasters. But for many, such restrictions are new. In any event, the global nature of the restrictions put them on an entirely different scale not seen since the Second World War.Many provinces of the Anglican Communion have suspended public worship in response to local official advice. This, along with other restrictions people are being asked to face, may be daunting, confusing and upsetting.The first thing that we want to say is that the suspension of public corporate acts of worship does not mean that we stop worshipping God. We can worship Him and continue to pray both privately and within our families. We have a number of resources to help you pray, including the Anglican Cycle of Prayer, through which we can join together, around the world, to pray for specific dioceses and provinces of our Anglican Communion. You can find these at anglicancommunion.org/prayer.The second thing we want to say is a reminder to us all to continue to place our trust in God. In his letter to the Romans, the Apostle Paul said: “I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, Nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.”And Paul, with Timothy, in their letter to the Church at Philippi, said: “Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice! Let your gentleness be evident to all. The Lord is near. Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.”In our prayers, in addition to praying for those who are ill, and for those who are lonely, we should pray for wisdom for those in authority and for strength to be given to medical workers. We should do more than pray. We should also act by heeding the advice of our respective national and regional authorities who are working to contain the virus; and, we should care for those who are unable to care for themselves.We want you to know that we are all praying for you all at this time and we will continue to pray for the whole of God’s Church and God’s World.The Most Revd and Right Honourable Justin WelbyArchbishop of CanterburyPresident of the Anglican Consultative Council, Chair of the Primates’ MeetingThe Most Revd Paul KwongArchbishop of Hong KongChair of the Anglican Consultative CouncilThe Most Revd Josiah-Idowu-FearonSecretary General of the Anglican Communion This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA COVID-19, COVID-19: A message from global Anglican leadership The Archbishop of Canterbury, Anglican Consultative Council Chair and the Anglican Communion Secretary General write a joint letter to the Anglican Communion Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Health & Healthcare The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ center_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion, Archbishop of Canterbury, Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more


first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA COVID-19, Members of Trinity Episcopal Church of Morrisania meet online via Zoom on April 19, 2020, for Morning Prayer led by the Rev. Andrew Kadel, the congregation’s regular supply priest. The South Bronx, New York, congregation members have had to overcome technical challenges to maintain community online. Screenshot: Paula Schaap[Episcopal News Service] The vestry of Trinity Episcopal Church of Morrisania, a historic West Indian congregation in the South Bronx, called an emergency phone meeting on March 18 to discuss the Diocese of New York’s decision two days earlier to suspend public worship. Its members were unsure how the decision would impact Trinity’s mostly elderly congregation.Warden Paula Roberts had already been thinking about how to hold the congregation together if churches had to suspend in-person services because of the COVID-19 pandemic.“How can we keep people together?” was Roberts’ main concern, she told Episcopal News Service. The church already had a phone conference line, but then she thought of Zoom, the video conferencing application. “This was a time for me to challenge myself,” she said.Trinity’s vestry was supportive, but there were also reservations.“We talked about how most people may not have a computer. Most of them are elderly or not computer savvy,” Roberts said. “But we said, ‘OK, that’s fine; people can still use our conference line, or they can dial in to Zoom.’”Still, the job of contacting parishioners about the church’s online service offerings was decidedly low-tech: letters were mailed explaining the move to Zoom, accompanied by the readings from the Fourth Sunday in Lent through Easter Sunday. The vestry and other church leaders then made follow-up phone calls.Trinity went live with its first Zoom service March 22, with Morning Prayer instead of Holy Eucharist. More people dialed in to the telephone conference than accessed the visual or audio service on Zoom.Lilas Bogle, who is in her mid-80s and a retired registered nurse, said she needed her granddaughter to help her set up the visual part of Zoom. But the result was worth the try, she told ENS.“I like the camaraderie, I like father’s sermons,” she said. Yet, she continued, “I miss the physical church. I miss our singing, the choir, being with people in person and talking to them.”Like the majority of parishioners in Episcopal churches nationwide, members of Trinity Morrisania’s Anglo-Catholic congregation are older. Most emigrated to the South Bronx in the 1950s and 1960s, from Jamaica, Antigua and other former British overseas territories scattered throughout the Caribbean, according to a history prepared for the 150th anniversary of the church’s founding, which was celebrated in 2018. Though many parishioners have since moved to other nearby Bronx neighborhoods for better schools and housing, they still return to the church they knew as newly arrived immigrants, accompanied by their children and grandchildren.The church was founded in 1868 in what was then the town of Morrisania, and the cornerstone laid in 1874, almost a quarter-century before the Bronx became one of New York City’s five boroughs in 1898. COVID-19 came just after the church launched a $400,000 capital campaign to restore its parish hall built in 1905, a later addition to the original structure.So far, Roberts said, members are sending in their pledges, which she believes is partly a response to the church’s efforts to offer online services. But because the church only recently decided to use an online payment system due to COVID-19, she’s encountering technical obstacles with that, too.“PayPal is not set up yet,” Roberts said in an email. “Support keeps promising to contact us, but has not yet. I think they are overloaded.”Even with hiccups getting parishioners on to the Zoom platform, Trinity’s online services have been going over well.Most helpful, parishioners told ENS, is the sense of once again being together with their community during an especially hard season, as many of them know people who are sick or have died.Ona Jennings, who worked for many years as a nurse and hospital administrator at Montefiore Medical Center, a well-known teaching hospital in the Bronx, said she found out, on the same day, that three people she knew from Montefiore had died from COVID-19.In a time of so much death, Jennings said, she missed being able to attend church in person. “But I think we’re more attentive now, and it makes it better – it’s more precious,” she said of the online services.As Lent gave way to Holy Week, more people joined Trinity’s visual Zoom services, many from far away. On Easter Sunday, 75 people attended via Zoom, from New Jersey, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Colorado and California, Roberts said.The church is lucky to have a resident technology expert: Roger Emmanuel, the junior warden and subdeacon who works for a telecommunications company.Emmanuel took advantage of the projection options in Zoom to share the order of service and even play prerecorded hymns. “The feel was great,” he said. “For me, this was a continuation of my role in the church.”It was also gratifying to the small Bronx congregation that people who had been with them in the past returned for the online services, Roberts said. Two Episcopal Service Corps’ New York Service and Justice Collaborative fellows, who lived in Trinity’s rectory last year, worshipped virtually with them.One of them, Sara Fread, is now a first-year master of divinity student at Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, California. She joined Trinity’s service for Palm Sunday and was struck by the same sense of community she witnessed when she was resident there.“I was immediately reminded of how much the community cared for one another when we started virtual coffee hour – the cacophony of voices that erupted when Paula unmuted everyone,” Fread said.Virtual coffee breaks inserted into online services have become a time to make sure the church’s elderly members and shut-ins are being taken care of, Roberts said. During one of the scheduled breaks in the church’s three-hour service on Good Friday, there was a discussion about how to get vital medications to a disabled parishioner.And for the church’s Easter Sunday service, Walter Thompson, the parish’s former organist, volunteered to provide live music from his home in Warwick, New York, to support the congregation’s hymn singing.“People were thrilled with the Easter service,” Roberts said. “They loved the hymns, the prayers, and did not feel deprived by not being in the physical church space.”“I, for one, still missed the smell of incense,” she added.One of the concerns of the congregation’s members is that “stay at home” orders have made it hard to keep up their connection with the Morrisania neighborhood, at a time when it’s likely to be suffering disproportionately from the pandemic. Residents of the now largely Hispanic neighborhood, in which 38% of households live below the poverty line, are among those most vulnerable to the devastating health and economic effects of COVID-19.So, on April 4, parishioners spread the palms that had been purchased for Palm Sunday on a table in front of the church, along with the day’s lessons and a poem about the pandemic in English and Spanish. They stood the approved distance away from the table and called to passersby, inviting them to take palms.Roberts recognized a woman who always came to the church’s monthly neighborhood thrift shop. “I wanted to hug her, but I couldn’t,” she said. “So I just called to her to please take some palms.”– Paula Schaap is an Episcopalian and a writer and editor who covers religion, science and finance. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT South Bronx Episcopal church rises to meet new challenges amid COVID-19 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Health & Healthcare Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA By Paula Schaap Posted Apr 24, 2020 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more